Press Kit

Author's Contact Information and Biography


Name: Tim Ljunggren

E-Mail: timljunggren@koankreativity.com

Telephone Number: 406-209-9530

Website: koankreativity.com

Social Media:

     Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100014921441730

     Twitter: https://twitter.com/KoanKreativity

     Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/koankreativity/

Biography: Tim Ljunggren is an Episcopal priest, a filmmaker, a writer, and a painter. He published and edited the flash fiction e-zine insolent rudder from 2001 until 2009, which was named by Poets & Writers magazine as one of the top literary sites on the internet. Ljunggren’s own flash fiction stories have been published in numerous literary magazines. He is currently working on a documentary entitled Big Sky Creativity: Montana Artists and Their Passions, along with other short film projects.

Since 2001, Ljunggren has been facilitating “creativity clusters” to inspire and cajole people to reconnect with their creativity.

Ljunggren lives in Montana with his wife, Linda, and their three dogs (Benji, Cajun, and Ranger).

Product Details


TITLE: Koan Kreativity: Using Ancient Wisdom to Inspire Modern Creativity

AUTHOR: Tim Ljunggren

PUBLISHER: Gentle Thug Publishing

PUBLICATION DATE: February 2017

ISBN-13: 978-0692837580

 ISBN-10: 0692837582

NUMBER OF PAGES: 130

PRODUCT DIMENSIONS: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.51(d)

Book Excerpt

Nan-in, a Japanese master during the Meiji era (1868-1912), received a university professor who came to inquire about Zen.

Nan-in served tea. He poured his visitor’s cup full, and then kept on pouring.

The professor watched the overflow until he no longer could restrain himself. “It is overfull. No more will go in!”

“Like this cup,” Nan-in said, “you are full of your own opinions and speculations. How can I show you Zen unless you first empty your cup?”

                                                                        ***

As artists, there are times when we can become full of ourselves. We can forget that the creative process is one in which we’re asked to keep ourselves empty so that we can be filled over and over again by our Muse.

We must allow ourselves to become perpetual students, not seeking mastery of certain artistic skills for mastery’s sake, but emptying ourselves empty so that we can be filled over and over again by our Muse.

We must allow ourselves to become perpetual students, not seeking mastery of certain artistic skills for mastery’s sake, but emptying ourselves to the possibility of lessons yet to be learned.

For years, I thought of myself as a filmmaker, but I rarely picked up a camera. It was far more important for me to keep my cup full by cramming it with books, lectures, and videos on the techniques of filmmaking. How could I truly be a filmmaker without knowing the “rule of threes”? How could I call myself a filmmaker without viewing the entire film collection of David Lynch? And Martin Scorsese? And Jean-Luc Godard? And Alfred Hitchcock?

I was afraid to pick up a camera. I wanted to cram my mind with all sorts of filmmaking information and techniques to avoid picking up a camera.

As any Zen master will tell us, we learn Zen by doing Zen. As any poet will tell us, we learn poetry by writing poetry. As any filmmaker will tell us, we learn to make movies by making movies. But first, we artists must let go of the illegitimate fears that flow through us.

We simply empty ourselves to do our work because the work is all that there is.




Table of Contents


A Cup of Tea..........3

Everything is the Best..........7

Calling Card..........11

Every-Minute Zen..........15

Zen Dialogue..........19

Your Light May Go Out..........23

In Dreamland..........27

The First Principle..........36

Three Days More..........41

What Are You Doing! What Are You Saying!..........46

The Giver Should Be Thankful..........51

Gisho’s Work...........56

Fire Poker Zen..........62

In the Hands of Destiny..........66

Sour Miso..........70

Storyteller’s Zen..........74

The Stone Mind..........79

Kasan Sweat..........83

Zen in a Beggar’s Life..........87

Great Waves..........91

Trading Dialogue for Lodging..........96

The Most Valuable Thing in the World..........102

Is That So?..........106

Final Words and One Last Koan..........110

About the Author..........114